One huge factor for prospective homeowners when looking for a house, is the age and condition of the roof. There are a lot of things that affect the lifespan and health of your roof if not maintained properly. In this article we will discuss different types of roof fungus, what causes them to grow, and how to treat and prevent it in the future.

Types

There are four common types of roof fungus that cause the most problems, whether it be damage to your home or your health.

roof fungusThe first one we will talk about is Algae. This fungus is particularly damaging to the roof itself when not taken care of as soon as it’s noticed. Algae will devour your shingles, and is also attracted to moisture. So when the spores land on moisture deposits on your roof, they will make a home for themselves there. Spreading across your roof, the ideal place for algae to spawn is somewhere damp and humid. Households in the deep south, northeast, Midwest and Pacific coast should look for the black-green hue on their roof.

The next roof fungus is something everyone will know. Moss. If properly maintained, this fuzzy green fungus can be a beautiful aesthetic piece for the outside of your home. However, like most fungus, moss is also attracted to moisture, which can be detrimental to your roof health. The more the moss spreads over your roof, the more it will add to your moisture problem on your roof. This can seep into the wood of shakes and shingles and lead to roof rot.

Mold is one of the most problematic fungi there is for a homeowner. Not only is it unsightly, it is extremely hazardous to the health of you and your family. It’s easy to notice because of its distinguished smell and the way it looks. It can be a slimy black, brown or even dark green color. Again, moisture deposits attract mold. The most common place for mold to grow is on wood and drywall, where water might seep in.

The last one we will discuss is Mildew, which like mold, is very dangerous if left to fester and grow. Unlike its fungi counterparts, mildew spreads extremely fast in warm and wet places. This includes roofs that don’t have proper drainage systems in place. You can spot this nasty fungus due to its wide color range; light grey, pink or black.

Common Factors 

After discussing these fungi, there is an underlying factor they all have in common: Moisture, dampness, humidity. Excess amounts of moisture on your roof can lead to any one of these fungi infestations. Remember, the two most dangerous fungi are Mold and Mildew. These can cause serious respiratory problems in your family if exposed to it for too long.

How do you treat Roof Fungus?

If the roof fungi haven’t damaged the structural integrity of the roof, you should be able to clean it yourself. You can do this easily with a 1:1 ratio of bleach and water. Bleach kills fungus on contact. Simply mix the bleach and water, spread the mix over your roof with a mop, and hose the roof off. This will be the perfect time to check on your gutters to make sure they are draining properly.

After cleaning off the roof, treat the roof with a moisture resistant solution to help keep moisture off. Next, try trimming branches that may be hanging over your roof. Over hanging branches may causing excess water buildup. Finally, make sure your attic and roof can vent heat and humidity properly with ridge vents.

So, if you notice water marks, peeling paint, peeled plaster or discoloration you might have a leak cause by unwanted fungus. Call us today, we would love to come take a look and help you get back to healthy, fungus-free living!

One of the least exciting things that can happen to a homeowner is roof rot. It might not sound like much of an issue, because “out of sight, out of mind” right? When this problem becomes evident by water spots on your ceiling or even plaster falling off, you know its past time to check in the attic for the cause. Here at Beneficial Roofing, we are experts at not only dealing with this problem, but also preventing it.

What causes Roof Rot?

There are a lot of things that can ultimately lead to roof rot, but the three main causes are:  humidity due to temperature changes in the attic, moisture from the condensation caused by the temperature, and ventilation problems. You may be asking yourself, “What exactly is roof rot?” Roof rot, or dry rot as it is commonly known, is what happens when there is too much moisture in your attic. Another cause could be a water leak somewhere in your roof, allowing water to seep into your attic.

Whatever the cause, our technicians can find it and help you move forward with fixing the problem and helping to ensure that it won’t happen again.

How do you deal with Roof Rot?

It is possible to “repair” dry rot, if the areas that are affected are not responsible for structural stability. If it is not a beam, joint or flooring, it might be worth looking into repairing instead of replacing. Before dealing with the damaged wood itself, make sure you find the cause of the problem. Whether it’s a leaking roof, poor ventilation, plumbing leaks or a damaged gutter, once it is fixed, you can focus on the wood.

Should you Repair or Replace Roof Rot?

The repairing process starts with removing as much of the damaged wood as possible. The best tool to use is a wood chisel. Injecting a consolidant into the wood will help reinforce the affected wood that you might not be able to reach with the chisel. This will help the wood fibers bond with the undamaged wood, making them strong again. To finish the repair, apply a wood patching product, a putty like material. Doing this yourself could be dangerous. Not removing all the affected wood could lead the rot to seep deeper into the rest of the wood. This will eventually causing the same problem.

The replacing process is a little different. You will need to remove all the rotted wood, including three feet of surrounding wood. Then remove the plaster, skirting paneling, linings and ceilings to make sure you got all the fungus. Next you must clean all the surfaces and steel pipes in a five-foot radius of the rotted parts. Next, you will need to apply a fungicide to all the surface area in that five-foot radius. Then you replace the wood you took out, preferably with one that has a preservative coating already on it. Lastly, you have to re-plaster and paint, typically with a zinc oxychloride product.

All of this is a very complicated, tiresome, and sometimes dangerous process that is best left to professionals, so you don’t have to stress and worry.

How can Roof Rot be prevented?

The best way to make sure that your roof is rot-free is to have regular inspections done. Having a professional come to check your attic will insure that if there are any signs of moisture, leaks or excess humidity, you will be able to take measures to rectify these problems. Another thing to do is to make sure that you have a proper roof ventilation system. Without a ventilation system in place, the moisture from the humidity has nowhere to go, thus sinking into the wood and causing this problem. You should also keep track on how your shingles are holding up. Make sure that there is no debris on your roof preventing water from running off the roof.

Don’t let the troubles of a rotted roof weigh down you and your family, give us a call! We are more than happy to help make sure that roof rot won’t bother you again.

confused smiley faceOne of the unsung heroes for a homeowner is a roof, but more importantly, the shingles on the roof. Without shingles on your roof, you just have a bunch of nice wood planks left exposed to all the elements.

But how do you know what type, style and material of shingle you should have?

Any reputable roofing company will tell you that the climate in which you live will be a big deciding factor when looking for the perfect shingles for your home. In this article, we will go over what shingles work best in various climates. This will make choosing your new roof a whole lot easier!

What Shingles Work Best In Hot Climates?

terracotta roof shinglesThe main thing you need out of your roof in hot climates is the ability to reflect heat. This will help keep your home cool by controlling the harshness of the sun rays from seeping inside.

Terracotta and clay are great material choices for hot weather. They are heat-resistant and extremely durable. Not only are they strong and dependable, but they can be very aesthetically pleasing, adding a nice zest to the outside appearance of your home.

slate roof shinglesAnother great material for your shingles is slate tiles. This is a natural material that is often requested by homeowners who value the vintage look. The lighter colored slate tiles help to reflect the heat, while darker colored tiles absorb it, Make sure that you have a balanced amount of each. Keep in mind that the prices for slate tiles might be more than other options.

metal sheet roofingMetal sheets, contrary to popular belief, are great options for roofing material in hotter climates. They are extremely durable. If you choose a lighter color of metal, the shingles will efficiently resist heat without letting the sun rays in. They are also a great option for the budget-savvy homeowner; they will quickly pay for themselves in their performance.

What Shingles Work Best In Cold Climates?

Now that we’ve covered options for hot climates, it’s time to see what materials hold up best in cold climates.

asphalt shinglesAsphalt is a common roofing material seen in colder climate areas, because it maintains its structural integrity so well against the colder elements. If your roof does incur damage, it is very easy for a professional to replace the damaged shingles. If you decide to go with an asphalt material, make sure you talk to us about impact-resistant shingles, so you can really get more bang for your buck.

Composite shingles are a lightweight alternative to a slate and cedar shake that is becoming quite popular. So long as you have a great foundation on your house, this type of material will offer more than enough reinforcement to your roof. It will keep you and your family safe and warm in the colder climates.

wood shinglesWe didn’t forget about wood shingles. This type of shingle is often used in cold climates, because it can provide twice the amount of insulation that an asphalt roof does. Wood shingle material will last about 25 years, so you won’t have to worry about replacing it for quite some time.

wood shake shinglesWood shake roofs are also a great material to use in cold climates. Because wood shakes are even thicker than wood, they will be able to resist stronger winds, rain and hailstones better than another roof material. Wood shake roofs last up to about 35 to 40 years if maintained properly.

Shingle Maintenance

As with any roof shingles, you need to take care of them with annual or biannual inspections and regular maintenance. Clear your gutters and regularly make sure no pests have made themselves at home. By doing these things, you will get the most life out of your roof system, no matter what type of climate you live in.

What are you waiting for?

Call Beneficial Roofing today to find out how we can help you choose the right material for your roof.

There is a lot more to roofing shingles than most people think.

roofing shinglesChoosing the right type of shingle and material is crucial to any homeowner. Not only do your shingles protect your home from water, snow and ice, but they also add to curb appeal — an important factor in determining your home’s value.

Roof shingles also affect household temperatures and energy efficiency. A  cool roof will generally be lighter in color to reflect heat from the roof surface. This, in turn, helps maintain cooler temperatures inside the home.

The type of shingles you choose also affects the lifespan of not only your roof, but your home as well. In this article, we will discuss the most common styles of shingles, and what they are typically made from.  Remember, types of shingles are not the same thing as shingle material.

3-Tab Roof Shinglesroofing shingles 3 tab

This is the most common shingle style in North America. It is usually made of asphalt, and they create the rectangular shingle style you see. One of the reasons this type of shingle is so popular is it is a simple design, and it is also cheap and virtually hassle free to install. They come in a wide range of colors which is great for homeowners on a budget.

Architectural Roof Shingles

roofing shingles architechturalThis style of shingle is a jack-of-all-trades in the roofing industry. These shingles are also typically made of asphalt and come in a great variety of colors and shapes. The Architectural Roof Shingle would be the perfect choice for virtually any type of roof. This style of shingle is more aesthetically pleasing than a basic 3-tab roof shingle.

Tile Roof Shinglesroofing shingles tile

These roof tiles are mainly found in the Southwest due to them being more energy-efficient compared to asphalt shingles. This terracotta clay tile is typically used on historical homes and buildings with old world, California mission architecture stylings. They are most easily recognized by their “wave-shaped” Spanish tile, they are readily available in different styles and colors. Higher quality tiles can last anywhere from 50 years or even longer than 100 years.

Wood Roof Shingles

roofing shingles wood

Wood shingles are also a very common type of shingle. These sustainable shingles have been used for centuries because they offer better insulation than asphalt. When its used on eclectic construction styles, it can drastically change the ambiance of your home. There is a difference between wood shingles and wood shakes. While wood shakes are split on either one or both sides, to make a textured grain effect, wood shingles are sawn on both sides to make a smoothed tapered shape.

Shake Roof Shingles

roofing shingles shake shingles

Like the wood roof shingles, these shingles have also been used for a very long time. Wood shakes are different from wood shingles because they are more rustic and textured in appearance. In recent years, there have been new types of composite materials that are used to make more durable and longer lasting shakes that maintain their color and have better resistance to wind and fire.

Slate Roof Shingles

roofing shingles slate

These tiles are quite popular because they make a stone roof that is natural and provide colorful distinctions in the surface of the stones. They are eco-friendly, fireproof and very durable. Some of our oldest structures still have the original slate roofing. Large slate deposits discovered in the colonial Northeast prompted the development and refinement of these beautiful and distinctive roofing materials

Metal Roofing

metal roofing

This type of roof is made up of flat or corrugated metal panels. It is usually referred to as the standing seam roof  and is the most common style of metal roofing systems. These types of roof systems are typically made from coated steel or aluminum, but can also be made using copper, steel, zinc alloys and stainless steel.

 

 

 

2 story home curb appealHopefully this article gave you heads up that a roof is more than just a roof. Your roof provides shelter, adds aesthetic appeal and helps regulate temperature in your home. One major factor in putting on a roof is the choice of shingles to be used. Whether it’s time to put a new roof on your existing home or you’re having a home built, we have experts standing by to help you make the best choice of roofing shingle for your home. Give us a call today!

Here are some terms to help you learn the roofing lingo…

Whether you’re building a new home and want a professional to install the roof or you already own a home and you’re needing a new roof installation due to damage or age, Beneficial Roofing has you covered. We install all kinds of roofs for residential and commercial buildings.

Ever wonder what’s going on when the “roofing guys” are on your roof? Read on for a brief version of what’s happening up there.

A discussion of roofing comes with its own vocabulary. Below are some of the most common terms and their definitions. (Definitions from: here, here, and here)

  1. Deck: The surface installed over the supporting framing members to which the roofing is applied.
  2. Eaves: The horizontal, lowest edge of a sloped roof that extends beyond the exterior wall.
  3. Rakes– The vertical edges of gable-style roof planes.
  4. Flashing- Pieces of metal or roll roofing used to prevent seepage of water into a building around any intersection or projection in a roof such as vent pipes, chimneys, adjoining walls, dormers, and valleys.
  5. Step flashing: Flashing application method used where a vertical surface meets a sloping roof plane. Individual pieces extend on the roof plane and up the vertical surface and are overlapped and stepped up the roof as shingles are applied.
  6. Drip Edge: A non-corrosive metal lip that keeps shingles up off the deck at roof edges and extends shingles out over eaves and rakes
  7. Underlayment: A layer of asphalt-saturated felt (sometimes referred to as tar paper) which is laid down on a bare deck before shingles are installed to provide additional protection for the deck.
  8. Valley: The internal angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes to provide water runoff.
  9. Ice dam: Condition formed at the lower roof edge by the thawing and refreezing of melted snow on the overhang. Can force water up and under shingles, causing leaks.
  10. Ice-and-water shield: Thin, self-adhering rubberized asphalt membrane applied before underlayment, but over the drip edge at the eaves to help mitigate potential leaks from ice dams
  11. Ridge: The uppermost, horizontal external angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes.
  12. Sheathing: Exterior-grade boards used as a roof deck material.

 

Upon the rooftop…

So, now that we know a little bit of the roofer’s lingo, let’s see just what they do up on your roof.

  1. Preparation
    1. The old shingles and flashings will be removed.
    2. The decking will be swept as clean as possible. Loose sheathing will be reattached, and sheathing will be inspected for damage prior to new shingles being placed.
  2. Barrier placement
    1. Drip edge installed at the eaves
    2. Ice-and-water membrane applied over the drip edge at the eaves
    3. Metal flashing and ice-and-water membrane applied in the valleys as well as any protrusions (plumbing stacks and attic vents, for example) from the roof
    4. Ice-and-water membrane applied to the rakes
    5. Felt underlayment is applied to the whole roof, each strip overlapping the previous layer by several inches
    6. The drip edge applied to the rakes, OVER the ice-and-water membrane and underlayment
  3. Shingle placement and finishing
    1. Starter shingles placed along the eaves extending past the fascia, drip edge, ice-and-water barrier, and underlayment
    2. Shingles applied in overlapping rows from eaves to ridge
    3. Metal step flashing applied with shingles at joints where the roof meets a wall or chimney.
    4. Roofers finish roof using specially-made pieces for capping the ridge.
    5. Roofers make a final pass across the entire roof, ensuring every nail is sealed with a professional strength sealant.

Congratulations! Your New Roof Rocks!

Thankfully, you won’t need a new roof very often. But, when age or weather damage keeps your roof from doing its job and threatens further damage to your home and belongings, we’re here to help. Beneficial Roofing offers a free consultation and award-winning professional roofing and customer service. With special pricing and financing available, we help you work with your homeowner’s insurance to make sure you get what you need at the price you can afford. Give us a call today! We’ve got you covered.